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Elaine R
Guest
 Email

Friday, September 27, 2002
01:51:28
Subject: #1 flower for drying
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Message:
My husband and I have just purchased 50 acres of land in Ontario. I have managed to get two acres for my own endeavors (flowers versus his cash cropping of soy bean). I would like to know which flower is the a)easiest to grow b)most popular in arrangements and c)easiest to dry.

I am pretty familiar with the concept of drying but have never done it on a large scale. I have access to a barn for drying and have designed smaller drying sheds for the future.

In order to prove the viability of a dried flower farm I need to choose a flower that would be chosen for the "dried flower growing for idiots book"...a can't fail flower. So please help me with my decision. I'm leaning towards strawflowers. yes?


dscott
Administrator
 Email

Tuesday, October 01, 2002
21:05:54
RE: #1 flower for drying
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Message:

Tough question because it really depends on many environmental factors (weather, soil, etc.). My very best recommendation would be to grow 20 to 30 different items and experiment which will be best suited for your particular climate/environment. This is not always easy to analysis though because each year gives us a different growing season. We have been growing for 14 years and we still see very different results between crops from year to year (some which are very inconsistent).

You also need to think about what will sell in your particular market. Growing the 'easiest' without being able to sell it may turn out to be the most difficult crop. Ask around and see what dried flowers are in demand (florists, art and craft shows, etc.).

I would plant one acre in perennials and the other acres in annuals. Remember that it can take up to two years for the perennials to be productive. Now concerning 'easiest', the nice thing about certain perennials is that you do not have to plant them each year (definitely easier!).

Go back to our home page and scroll down the page to the various links. Find the link entitled "Dried Flowers by Type". I would select at least one floral from each group (e.g. herb, grasses and grains, pods, etc.). The better the representation, the quicker you will learn what works for you and what does not.

Word of warning: I would never recommend growing just one or two item. Think about it, if you have a crop failure..., you loose everything. Diversification has its big advantages.

I know I did not give you the answer you were after but I hope that I helped some.

If you would like me to review your proposed list for next growing season, I would be happy to give you a specific opinion on each individual floral (probably best to email me directly, drieds@linkny.com).

Good luck.

D. Scott Demmin



Elaine R
Guest
 Email

Tuesday, October 01, 2002
23:39:01
RE: #1 flower for drying
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Message:
Thank you for your offer to review my list of chosen flowers for planting. I have done a lot of homework in the marketing aspect. But now am looking for advice and knowledge that only fellow growers can give. I will follow up with an email as you suggested. I appreciate the time you are willing take to give me a little guidance.

Talk to you soon,

Elaine Rybka



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